Common Misconceptions About Dental Health

gum disease ManhattanWhile many patients are conscientious about their oral hygiene, they may still be holding on to misconceptions that could be compromising their oral health. Here are a few common dental myths that many people believe.

  • It’s no big deal if my gums are bleeding after I brush. Bleeding gums are always cause for concern, as that symptom can indicate early stage gum disease. Other signs of gum disease include redness or swelling in the gums, as well as pockets that develop between the teeth and gums or loose teeth. If you notice any of these problems, consult with a dentist or a periodontist for a thorough examination and to determine what treatment is recommended.  
  • I don’t really need to see my dentist every six months. Routine dental care helps dentists to diagnose oral diseases in their earliest stages, when more conservative interventions can be effective. For example, in the case of gum disease, the condition will get progressively more severe over time. If you let a year or more lapse between dental exams, you may find that the periodontist has to use an invasive cleaning technique or even a surgical approach to address the issue. Alternatively, gingivitis – the mildest form of gum disease – often responds to a thorough professional cleaning.
  • It’s ok to skip brushing and flossing every so often. Brushing and flossing are your best defense against oral bacteria on a day-to-day basis between those necessary dental appointments mentioned above. It’s very important to brush twice a day and floss daily to keep plaque and tartar – which provide a haven for inflammation-causing bacteria – at bay.

Are you finding it difficult to separate dental facts from fiction? An outdated belief may be increasing your risk for gum disease, decay or other oral diseases. You can always feel free to contact our office at 212-756-8890 to discuss any questions that you may have about gum health or concerning symptoms that you’ve noticed in your gums.

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