Gum Disease: What can I do to reduce my risk?

Gum disease is an infection that represents the inflammation and the eventual destruction of the structures that hold your smile together. The gum tissue, the microscopic ligaments and fibers, and the jawbone must all work together to support your teeth. When these tissues become infected, the consequences can make your smile unattractive, your breath unpleasant, and even harm the rest of your body.

The effects of these consequences can be controlled when you receive the appropriate gum disease treatment, but your very best line of defense involves educating yourself on reducing your risk in the first place. You should plan to recruit the professional help of a periodontist, since preventing and fighting gum disease typically requires a team effort.

Reducing your risk should begin with proper oral hygiene efforts. Since gum disease is an infection that is generally caused by bacteria, thorough brushing and flossing are essential. Your periodontist can assist you in adapting your routine to address issues such as cleaning areas that may be hard to reach. Allowing bacteria to colonize along your gumline or between your teeth for even a single day can increase your risk for an infection.

Lowering the risk for gum disease can also be accomplished when you protect your overall health. A healthy immune system can ward off the inflammation caused by gum disease. When you are unhealthy due to stress, smoking, or your eating habits, fighting a gum infection may be almost impossible.

Unhealthy gums are commonly associated with a bacterial infection, but there are some outside factors that can also destroy your smile. Abrasive scrubbing with the toothbrush, clenching and gritting the teeth, as well as crowded teeth or an unbalanced bite can cause irreversible trauma to your gums. You can significantly decrease your risk by subjecting your teeth and gums to less physical stress.

To schedule your gum disease treatment or for more information, contact our skilled periodontists for an appointment today.

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